Wing Chun Dictionary

 

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Chinese-English

A-B-C-D-E-F-G-H-I-J-K-L-M-N-O-P-Q-R-S-T-U-V-W-X-Y-Z

English-Chinese

A-B-C-D-E-F-G-H-I-J-K-L-M-N-O-P-Q-R-S-T-U-V-W-X-Y-Z

*NOTE*

The red highlighted letters on the Chinese-English sections of the Dictionary are those pages that include photos as of today. We hope to include new photos on a weekly basis. The photos are meant to serve as a guide, and not to be a teaching tool. The Maine Academy is not responsible for any person or persons who may be injured or killed attempting to replicate any of the actions in the photos, nor does the Academy endorse such practice.-Robert Anthony

 

 

This dictionary represents my findings from researching some of the basic Wing Chun terms that were taught to me, and those that I have come across in my research. While many of the terms that I have included may not bear much in the way of similarity to what is considered to be correct, I do not infer that mine are correct, either. Only that these are what I found to be true of myself through hundreds of hours of research through the use of four different Chinese dictionaries. Other view points are always welcome, and I am always open to the opinion of others. It may be that some of the terms that have been handed down over time no longer exist in the modern dialects of Cantonese. In most cases, I have used the traditional spellings of Wing Chun terms. I have also used the Hong Kong Linguistic Society's Cantonese Jyutpin Romanization spelling of Chinese to English words. While there are differences between the Yale and the Jyutpin dictionaries, they rely upon the same Chinese characters. The Jyutpin dictionary was created to provide more uniformity in the Romanization of Chinese words. -Robert Anthony

 

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Last Updated 21 April, 2011

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